Seminar Writing Diaspora: Myth, History and Reinvention of the Self

ACLA, Harvard University

How much (or, what) influence does exile exert in literary writing? Accounts of exile and diaspora show that the attempt to relate the experience of displacement leads to a renewal of narrative. The experience of displacement dictates writers and artists’ conceptions of the world and sense of belonging. How does this ‘duality’ of living between two or more cultures affect relationships and perceptions of the Other and the Self?

Seminar’s presentation, program and abstracts

Interactive Narratives, New Media and Social Engagement International Conference

Victoria College, University of Toronto

An interdisciplinary conference for researchers and practitioners. In the evolution of narrative practices from text-based literature to the advent of the digital revolution as storytelling moves from literacy to so-called post-literacy. The prevalence of new interactive digital narrative in all areas from games, to literature, to films, to video art has resulted in new forms of storytelling and, accordingly, provoked new practices of reading that transforms readers/viewers into active collaborators. Physical public space is increasingly being substituted or augmented by virtual space through digital screens (e.g. video, film, computer). What effect do these new developments have on social space, seen here as encompassing both physical public spaces (streets, hotels, coffee shops) as well as virtual space (YouTube, Vine, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram)? How do these novel practices effect previously clearly demarcated frontiers between the public and the private? Throughout the world, from Brazil to Turkey to Canada, we have recently witness the influence of social media on political participation. How have these new platforms engendered innovative forms of expression?

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Proceedings

Film, Media and Social Engagement in the Digital Age

Victoria College, University of Toronto

The conference discussions will be focused on film, media and social engagement in the digital age. The goal is to propose a broad debate, emphasizing the need to evaluate the increasing use of digital screens in contemporary society and how people and countries are dealing with their own image, identity and digital cultural space artistically, socially and politically. Film and media practitioners and educators have been expanding the use of digital media through new experiences with unusual and innovative technical and artistic approaches. At the same time, researchers and academics are questioning and analyzing these new practices, which are increasingly dominating global society. The way in which people and countries are dealing with the advent of new technologies reflects social issues and makes us deepen the debate on matters such as our own identity and the state of research conducted in these countries. How are countries acting in face of these new phenomena? Does globalization standardize the use of new media? How are the countries reacting?

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